Browse Prior Art Database

Secondary Power Distriution Source for Point-of-Sale Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106257D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 6 page(s) / 211K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Joyce, JM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described is a hardware implementation of a secondary power distribution facility that distributes switch-mode-power (SMP) to point-of-sale (POS) systems so as to reduce terminal counter space requirements. Both simplex and duplex power network facilities are also described.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 47% of the total text.

Secondary Power Distriution Source for Point-of-Sale Systems

      Described is a hardware implementation of a secondary power
distribution facility that distributes switch-mode-power (SMP) to
point-of-sale (POS) systems so as to reduce terminal counter space
requirements.  Both simplex and duplex power network facilities are
also described.

      The trend in POS systems is to reduce the size, weight and
cooling requirements of front counter POS equipment.  To accomplish
this, the concept described herein provides a means whereby a POS
power supply is self contained in a small, light weight modular unit.
The unit utilizes high frequency power components to convert power
line Vac to regulated output Vdc.  Optionally, POS power subsystems
can have added batteries and a battery charger under the enclosure to
safe-guard transaction data during power outages and to provide
restart functions after power returns.

      Fig. 1a is an isometric view showing a prior art POS terminal
and Fig. 1b shows a top view of the power components positioned
within the POS terminal.  Fig. 2a shows how a single power
distribution source is used to supply power to three terminals.  Fig.
2b shows the subsystem secondary power distribution facility.
Electro-magnetic interference (EMI) filters and Vac rectifiers are
used to convert AC to DC.  A primary bulk DC-DC converter and a
secondary DC-DC converter supplies the required regulated voltages.
The power-load boundary (Fig. 2b) is a mechanical interface, such as
a connector/cable, between the regulated Vdc output and the logic
converter voltage (Vcc) planar board input.  This power-load boundary
represents a limit to the physical separation between the power
supply and the logic-analog load.  Generally regulated Vdc
distribution will not exceed two to three feet at the load-power
interface.  In a dynamic load environment the separation between the
power supply and the load may be only a few inches.

      Fig. 3 shows how the POS terminal sub-system is used in a Vdc
distribution power network.  The power system moves the physical
power-load boundary to within the power supply regulator envelope.
This permits a greater distance between the major elements in the
primary power convertor and the essentials of a POS terminal.  The
primary Vac line filter AC to DC, primary converter DC to DC and
battery back-up portions of the power supply can be located as much
as fifty feet from the POS terminal.

      Fig. 4 shows a one-on-one Vdc power distribution subsystem.
The primary-secondary load power regulator can also service other
components of the system, such as printers and displays.  This type
of configuration reduces the size, weight and thermal requirements of
POS stations.  Counter space requirements are reduced since bulky
power components are moved to a more space compatible environment,
such as a closet.  Modular DC to DC load regulators are used for the
distributed power regulat...