Browse Prior Art Database

Analog Circuit Model for Rapid Decomposition of Travelling Waves

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106281D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appel, WD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a circuit modeling technique which can be applied to separated segments of an analog transmission line network model in order to rapidly analyze the effects of incident and reflected waves. This technique is readily applicable to an analog modeling system supporting transmission lines, such as the Advanced Statistical Analysis Program (ASTAP).

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Analog Circuit Model for Rapid Decomposition of Travelling Waves

      Disclosed is a circuit modeling technique which can be applied
to separated segments of an analog transmission line network model in
order to rapidly analyze the effects of incident and reflected waves.
This technique is readily applicable to an analog modeling system
supporting transmission lines, such as the Advanced Statistical
Analysis Program (ASTAP).

      As shown in the figure, the transmission line model to be
evaluated is broken into a left segment 10 and a right segment 12.
Models of two identical resistive bridges, a left bridge 14 and a
right bridge 16, are connected, respectively, to these segments, with
models of current sources being used to provide current flow between
the segments.  Values of the resistances are chosen so that each of
these bridges is balanced to the characteristic impedance of the
transmission line.

      The voltage appearing across a left current source 18, which
represents incident energy, is amplified by a forward current source
20 to compensate for losses in the bridge.  This voltage, EFOR,
indicating the true incident energy, is also placed at resistance 22,
by means of current source 24, for propagation along right segment
12.

      Similarly, the voltage appearing at right current source 25,
which represents reflected energy, is amplified by a reverse current
source 26 to compensate for losses in the bridge.  This voltage,
EREV, indicating...