Browse Prior Art Database

Continous Discrete Entry

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106315D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chodorow, MS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A scheme is disclosed for displaying alphanumeric characters on a touch sensitive screen for input of characters in a keyboardless enviroment. The shceme involves displaying the character set in an arrangement that easily permits a stypus to be moved continuously along the input surface. Movement is continuous on the part of the user but character entry is discrete.

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Continous Discrete Entry

      A scheme is disclosed for displaying alphanumeric characters on
a touch sensitive screen for input of characters in a keyboardless
enviroment.  The shceme involves displaying the character set in an
arrangement that easily permits a stypus to be moved continuously
along the input surface.  Movement is continuous on the part of the
user but character entry is discrete.

      This scheme can be inplemented in software/firmware provided a
screen which is sensitive to the location of a pointing device - a
stylus, finger, or lightpen.  Code is required which can determine in
real time if the pointer is in close proximity to the designated
locations of the letters.  Code is required to pass the "keystroke"
information to the system.  Programs of this nature exist in current
systems which use "soft-keyboards".

      The scheme represents a few advantages over currently available
methods of keyboardless input of characters.  Recognition is more
accurate than that of systems requiring users to print characters.
There is no need for specialized recognition software for each
character set.  There is continuous movement on the part of the user,
making the input process faster and less tedious than the raisig and
lowering of the stylus required in printing.  Finally, the system can
be designed to allow the end-user to alter the arrangement of
characters on the screen.  One of many possible layouts is provided
in the Figure.