Browse Prior Art Database

Locating Alive Server through RPC Run Time

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106325D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lin, D: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

If a DCE client tries to establish a connection with a server which provides the compatible service, the client needs to call the RPC name service library routines to get the server bindings. However, the servers which registered in the global name space might not be availableuser user application (the client) needs to try the server binding obtained from the global name space one at a time until it finds an available server. The new RPC runtime function described in this disclo- sure will automatically locate an available server for the client.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Locating Alive Server through RPC Run Time

      If a DCE client tries to establish a connection with a server
which provides the compatible service, the client needs to call the
RPC name service library routines to get the server bindings.
However, the servers which registered in the global name space might
not be availableuser user application (the client) needs to try the
server binding obtained from the global name space one at a time
until it finds an available server.  The new RPC runtime function
described in this disclo- sure will automatically locate an available
server for the client.

      To make a remote procedure call, the first thing that the RPC
client does is to get a binding to the server it wants to acquire
services from.  The normal way to acquire the binding information is
from the global name space.  The server exports its binding
information to the namespace.  The client then calls the RPC name
service library routines to import a binding from the name space.
However, the binding is only a partial binding to the server.  The
partial binding might not be valid because the server's endpoint
database might not be up-to-date, or the server might not be
available because of hardware or network failure.  The client needs
to try the bindings obtained from the global name space one at a time
until it finds a valid binding.

      However, this is unnecessary complexity for a RPC user.  What
the user needs from the RPC run time service is to acquire a working
server binding with which he can invoke remote procedures.  In this
disclosure, a single RPC run time function to acquire acomplete
server binding is provided.  There is no need for the client to do
try and error as mentioned above.

The advantages for this new function are:

1.    Reduced user application complexity.  Only one API is needed to
    locate a available server.

2.    Smaller client.  Client does not need to...