Browse Prior Art Database

Technique to Convert a LAN Netview Start SQL Database Into ASCII Database Files

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106355D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 4 page(s) / 163K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Shrader, TJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique by which users can follow to convert their LAN NetView Start* program data from a Database Manager SQL database into ASCII files.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 35% of the total text.

Technique to Convert a LAN Netview Start SQL Database Into ASCII Database Files

      Disclosed is a technique by which users can follow to convert
their LAN NetView Start* program data from a Database Manager SQL
database into ASCII files.

      The LAN NetView Start product (Start) allows users to store
their networks, topologies, and workstations in either ASCII files,
managed by an internal ASCII database manager, or in a SQL database,
controlled by Database Manager (DBM), which is part of Extended
Services for OS/2*.  The two are not interchangeable.  Users cannot
save in SQL and load the data from ASCII.  The way the data is stored
between the two may also be obscure, since there does not seem to be
a direct correlation between how data is stored by the SQL and ASCII
database managers.  With this disclosed technique, users can convert
their data from a DBM SQL database into ASCII files.

      The Lan NetView Start program makes use of a tree of objects.
Network objects are the top most in this tree.  Within a network are
topologies and folders.  (Folders are treated like topology objects.)
Topologies can contain other objects as well, such as other
topologies, nodes, and transformers.

      Start ASCII files are stored in a single directory with an
entire network as the scope of the directory; thus different networks
would be stored in different directories.  The same is true of a DBM
database; each database represents a single network and all the
information contained in that network is stored in tables in the
database.  The ASCII and DBM databases diverge in how they store the
data.  For ASCII, the network and topology objects and their contents
are stored in separate files.  For the DBM, this information is
spread across tables.  There are fifteen SQL tables.  All topology
object information is stored in the TOPOLOGIES table, for example.

      This disclosure presents a way in which users can convert a
network and its topologies from a DBM database into ASCII database
files.  As mentioned earlier, network and topology data is stored
amongst fifteen SQL tables.  For ASCII, each network or topology file
has a specific structure that is common to all files of the same
type.  As their filenames, network files have their name along with a
".NET" extension.  Topologies have their object ID number along with
a ".TOP" extension as their filename.  Object IDs uniquely identify
objects in a network and as such, they are used as primary keys in
each of the SQL tables.  Except for the data lines after set names in
the network file, each data row in an ASCII file starts with the
object ID of that object.  Note that network and topology files are
structured differently.  The following is an example of an ASCII
topology file:

 .NETWORKS
 .TOPOLOGIES
 18, 2, 2, "Topology", 0, 197640, "NODE****", "0006", "emlan", 1,...
 .FOLDERS
 .NODES
 150, 18, 18, 24, 0, "NODE0001", 1, 332, 8, "SERVER01", 0, 0, 1...