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Method for Invoking Pre-Recorded Keystrokes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106422D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 4 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hayashi, Y: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for invoking pre-recorded keystrokes on display terminals or workstations or their emulatores on personal computers for SBCS (single byte character set) language. Each record of keystrokes is given one or more names for retreiving. When a key for retreiving a record (herinafter referred to as Play key) is depressed, the word closet to the cursor is regarded as a record name, and the corresponding keystrokes are replayed on the screen.

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Method for Invoking Pre-Recorded Keystrokes

      Disclosed is a method for invoking pre-recorded keystrokes on
display terminals or workstations or their emulatores on personal
computers for SBCS (single byte character set) language.  Each record
of keystrokes is given one or more names for retreiving.  When a key
for retreiving a record (herinafter referred to as Play key) is
depressed, the word closet to the cursor is regarded as a record
name, and the corresponding keystrokes are replayed on the screen.

      In this method, the "word" is defined as a character string
preceded and followed by delimiting characters.  Characters for
record names and delimiters may have dependency on the language used.
One example is to define alphanumeric characters for record names and
others, including space and null, for delimiters.  The user should be
allowed to define his/her own set of delimiters.

      When this method is invoked by depressing Play key, the
following process, for example, takes place to determine a word:

      If the cursor is at a delimiting character location (Fig. 1),
backward search (right to left direction for ordinary languages) is
initiated to find the last character of a word.  When it is detected,
the search is continuted for a delimiting character immediately
before the word to determine the word starting position.

      If the character at the cursor position is not a delimiting
character (Fig. 2), backward search is initiate...