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SwitchMAN - Switch-based ATM Gigabit MAN and Customer Premises Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106471D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Closs, F: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This article describes an ATM-compatible Gb/s Customer Premises Network (CPN) built from switch-based intelligent hubs interconnected via a backbone of Gb/s point-to-point trunks configured in a ring topology. The advantage of the proposed solution is the fact that the switch fabrics do not need to operate at Gb/s speed. This results in an economical attachment of low-cost intelligent hubs to a Gb/s backbone.

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SwitchMAN - Switch-based ATM Gigabit MAN and Customer Premises Network

      This article describes an ATM-compatible Gb/s Customer Premises
Network (CPN) built from switch-based intelligent hubs interconnected
via a backbone of Gb/s point-to-point trunks configured in a ring
topology.  The advantage of the proposed solution is the fact that
the switch fabrics do not need to operate at Gb/s speed.  This
results in an economical attachment of low-cost intelligent hubs to a
Gb/s backbone.

      Fig. 1 shows a sample configuration including traffic flows.
Cable segments between customer sites are operated as ATM-compatible
point-to-point full-duplex trunks (for simplicity, only a
unidirectional trunk is shown).  At each site there is an ATM switch,
e.g., a hub for local access or a telecommunications network node
(TNN) for WAN access.  The key component is the gigabit trunk adapter
(GTA).  It manages three traffic flows, the drop flow (ATM cells
terminating in the hub or TNN), the insert flow (ATM cells injected
into the Gb/s backbone by the hub or TNN), and the bypass flow (ATM
backbone traffic to downstream/upstream hubs or TNNs).  The key
feature of the GTA is a simple bypass mechanism which permits to
operate trunks at Gb/s speed (e.g., 2.4 Gb/s) while switch I/O ports
only have to operate at a fraction thereof (e.g., 155 Mb/s) for
carrying the drop and insert flows.  Only part of the GTA needs to
operate at Gb/s speed.  The network control architecture en...