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Browse Prior Art Database

Enhanced 3D Wick Heat Transfer with Local Delivery of Coolant

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106487D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, TM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A method of deriving the highest heat transfer per unit mass of coolant is described in this disclosure. The high heat transfer rates per unit mass of coolant provided through evaporation can be realized through a scheme in which the coolant (a dielectric liquid since it will come into direct contact with the chip) is delivered directly and individually to each chip.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 82% of the total text.

Enhanced 3D Wick Heat Transfer with Local Delivery of Coolant

      A method of deriving the highest heat transfer per unit mass of
coolant is described in this disclosure.  The high heat transfer
rates per unit mass of coolant provided through evaporation can be
realized through a scheme in which the coolant (a dielectric liquid
since it will come into direct contact with the chip) is delivered
directly and individually to each chip.

      In this invention, a wick material 1 is placed over a
high-powered chip 2.  This material will provide a uniform wetting of
the chip surface.  Since the dielectric liquids are notorious for
possessing poor surface tension, each chip is provided with coolant
directly through individual supply tubes 3.

      The vapor generated in the evaporation process is drawn from
the chip area and condensed.  Then, after cooling, the liquid is
delivered back to the wicks to continue the process.  Distribution of
the coolant to the chips is through the wicks.  The wicks receive the
coolant through an array of holes in the distribution line.

      A detail of the chip/wick/distribution line is presented in the
figure.  The coolant flows through the distribution line under
pressure - i.e., pumped.  Small orifices 4 in the line (not shown)
distribute the coolant to the wick.  Once in the wick, the coolant
moves under a combination of pressure and surface tension forces to
uniformly cool the chip.  The different cooling require...