Browse Prior Art Database

Ultrasonic Generator for Liquid Solder Applicator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106500D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hodgson, RT: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is an applicator for liquid metal solder which incorporates an ultrasonic generator to assist the soldering. Solder will generally not wet contaminated metal parts. However, if the solder is agitated by ultrasonic energy, it will frequently wet the parts it would not wet previously. Recently, a novel technique for applying solder to printed circuit board which allows more precise control of the solder so that finer features can be tinned has been disclosed [1,2]. This disclosure teaches that the applicator of [1] can also be used to channel ultrasonic energy to the part being tinned.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Ultrasonic Generator for Liquid Solder Applicator

      Disclosed is an applicator for liquid metal solder which
incorporates an ultrasonic generator to assist the soldering.  Solder
will generally not wet contaminated metal parts.  However, if the
solder is agitated by ultrasonic energy, it will frequently wet the
parts it would not wet previously.  Recently, a novel technique for
applying solder to printed circuit board which allows more precise
control of the solder so that finer features can be tinned has been
disclosed [1,2].  This disclosure teaches that the applicator of [1]
can also be used to channel ultrasonic energy to the part being
tinned.

That ultrasonic energy can be carried in a liquid jet is taught in
[3].

      The disclosed invention is sketched in Fig. 1.  A piezoelectric
ceramic tube 1 with ring electrodes 2 plated on the outside surrounds
a column of liquid solder 3 with a solder pressure sufficient to
cause some solder to protrude from the tube at position 4.  A phased
array power source 5 is used to apply voltages between the electrodes
2 on the outside of the tube and the grounded liquid solder 3 on the
inside of the tube.  The field in the ceramic tube causes the tube to
oscillate in a radial (and in a longitudinal) mode.  A phased
oscillating electric field is applied to each electrode, such that
the phase difference between two adjacent electrodes gives a time
delay which is exactly the time taken for the ultrasonic wave of the
d...