Browse Prior Art Database

Virtual Reality Passwork Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106534D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Becker, C: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed are several implementations of virtual password systems. Because virtual reality applications generally do not make use of traditional input devices, such as keyboards, normally used to input passwords, it becomes necessary to define alternate ways to assure secure access to programs and data within the virtual reality paradigm. The approaches disclosed allow the creation and use of algorithmically "long" passwords, while making it easy for a user to remember and execute the password sequence. In each case, the length of the password action sequence can be adjusted according to the security required.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Virtual Reality Passwork Systems

      Disclosed are several implementations of virtual password
systems.  Because virtual reality applications generally do not make
use of traditional input devices, such as keyboards, normally used to
input passwords, it becomes necessary to define alternate ways to
assure secure access to programs and data within the virtual reality
paradigm.  The approaches disclosed allow the creation and use of
algorithmically "long" passwords, while making it easy for a user to
remember and execute the password sequence.  In each case, the length
of the password action sequence can be adjusted according to the
security required.

      A polyhedron password system is disclosed in which a regular or
irregular virtual polyhedron appears in front of the user.  This
object may be touched, grasped, and turned in a large number of ways.
A series of these actions defines the correct password.  To aid in
the performance of the actions, various sides of the polyhedron are
marked with colors and/or symbols.  Even for a simple polyhedron,
such as a cube, many password combinations are available.  For a cube
implementation using the three basic actions described above (touch a
corner, touch a face, turn to a corner or face), there are 28 options
available at each step.  More complex polygons offer geometrically
increasing numbers of possible actions.  In one possible approach,
after a correct sequence has been entered, the polygon disappears,
revealing a smaller polygon within.  This scenario repeats until the
password sequence is repeated.

      Several variations on a maze password system are disclosed.  In
these systems, the user must traverse a conceptual "maze" to gain
access.  A version of this might put the user in the driver's seat of
a virtual car, with a "city" in front of him.  Only by traversing the
proper route is the correct password entered. ...