Browse Prior Art Database

Musicsal Instrument Digital Interface Auditioner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106650D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 4 page(s) / 151K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boykin, JR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an audio applet designed to illustrate the synthesizer support within the IBM Audio Capture and Playback Adapter and follow-on products without the standard need of MIDI song files.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 47% of the total text.

Musicsal Instrument Digital Interface Auditioner

      Disclosed is an audio applet designed to illustrate the
synthesizer support within the IBM Audio Capture and Playback Adapter
and follow-on products without the standard need of MIDI song files.

      Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) is a formal
description of the data used by electronic musical instruments and
computers to create electronic music.  MIDI data describes each
musical event (e.g., the start and the end of a note, the depression
and release of the sustain pedal, the selection of a new musical
instrument sound) as a specific command.  For example, a MIDI Note-On
command might define the start of the note, Middle C, to be played
loud using a piano sound.  For this MIDI command:

     Volume (e.g., loud) is defined by the number in the MIDI
     Note-On command's "music volume" parameter,

     Pitch (e.g., Middle C) is defined by the number in the MIDI
     Note-On command's "music note" parameter, and

     Musical instrument (e.g., piano) is selected in the MIDI
     Note-On command's "music channel" parameter.

      As a description of the musical event, MIDI bears little
resemblance to the actual audio waveform.  An audio waveform, analog
or digital, is an electrical signal that mimics the physical
properties of the audio performance; MIDI is a description of the
musical events that make up that musical performance.  An audio
waveform can record any sound; MIDI can generate only those sounds
that may be created by a music synthesizer.  MIDI is therefore seldom
able to generate speech but can create new sounds never heard before.
An audio waveform is a final result of a recording process and, once
recorded, is limited as to what can be modified; MIDI is a series of
computer commands that are easily modified to allow extensive
modification.

      A MIDI synthesizer creates sounds resembling both conventional
acoustic musical instruments as well as completely new sounds.  The
listing of sounds below follows the General MIDI standard and is
shown in two categories:  melodic sounds that are musical instrument
sounds that can be transposed (i.e., vary in pitch, such as a horn)
and percussion sounds that are musical instrument sounds that can not
be transposed (e.g., a drum or a cymbal).  General MIDI defines 128
different melody sounds and 47 different percussion sounds.

      Instruments are the names of the sounds created by a MIDI
synthesizer.  The General MIDI instruments are separated into two
classes:  melodic and percussive.  The instruments included in the
melodic class are grouped as follows:

       0 -   7   Piano

       8 -  15   Chromatic Percussion

      16 -  23   Organ

      24 -  31   Guitar

      32 -  39   Bass

      40 -  46   Strings

      47         Timpani

      48 -  55   Ensemble

      56 -  63   Brass

    ...