Browse Prior Art Database

Timed Sequential Equivalents Of Simultaneous Keystrokes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106689D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Holzman, TG: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention disclosure provides a simple way for users with impaired manual dexterity to take advantage of the special control functions resulting from simultaneous keystrokes (e.g., shift and an alpha key to produce a capital letter, Alternate-Control-Delete to reboot the system, and the Control key with the letter O to open a file in Presentation Manager*). On the control panel for the environment (e.g., on the OS/2* Control Panel), in addition to allowing the user to specify such things as time, date, cursor blink speed, and double click speed, the user would see a similar slider control for setting Control Character Interval.

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Timed Sequential Equivalents Of Simultaneous Keystrokes

      This invention disclosure provides a simple way for users with
impaired manual dexterity to take advantage of the special control
functions resulting from simultaneous keystrokes (e.g., shift and an
alpha key to produce a capital letter, Alternate-Control-Delete to
reboot the system, and the Control key with the letter O to open a
file in Presentation Manager*).  On the control panel for the
environment (e.g., on the OS/2* Control Panel), in addition to
allowing the user to specify such things as time, date, cursor blink
speed, and double click speed, the user would see a similar slider
control for setting Control Character Interval.

      The user would move the slider to set the interval to a
comfortable period during which a sequence of control character
keystrokes could be entered and the system would treat them as a
simultaneously input set of keystrokes.  One endpoint of the interval
would be O, which would be the default, corresponding to current
requirements of simultaneous keystrokes.

      This type of control function would go a long way toward
addressing U.S.  Government requirements that computers be usable by
handicapped individuals.  Considering the very large number of
individuals impaired by ailments like arthritis, multiple sclerosis,
etc., the payoff for this relatively easy-to-implement feature would
be high.  In fact, besides the assistance it would render to the
handicappe...