Browse Prior Art Database

Pointing Device Connected to a Personal Computer Memory Card International Association Card

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106693D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 4 page(s) / 133K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Auber, R: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for attaching a pointing device to a card configured to fit into a standard socket, as defined by the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) in Specification Release 2.0, in such a way that the pointing device may be mounted in various orientations relative to the card.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 49% of the total text.

Pointing Device Connected to a Personal Computer Memory Card International Association Card

      Disclosed is a method for attaching a pointing device to a card
configured to fit into a standard socket, as defined by the Personal
Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) in
Specification Release 2.0, in such a way that the pointing device may
be mounted in various orientations relative to the card.

      As shown in Fig. 1, a card 10 of this type includes sixty-eight
sockets 12 along an edge 14, which is inserted in a standard slot
within a system.  Contacts (not shown) within card 10 interface with
pins extending within a standard connector.  A pointing device 16,
configured for attachment to card 10, may include, for example, a
trackball 18 and three buttons 20.  Card 10 is extended outward, away
from edge 14, to provide a platform 22 for the attachment of device
16, outside the portion of card 10 which extends into a standard
socket when the card is plugged into a system.  Device 16 is plugged
into place by means of a number of pins 24 extending into a number of
sockets 26 to make electrical and mechanical contact with contact
springs (not shown).

      Pointing device 16 has a preferred orientation, in which, for
example, movement of trackball 18 upward or away from the user moves
the curser upward on the display screen of the system (not shown),
while movement of the trackball to the left moves the curser to the
left.  This orientation may be identified by a symbol, such as an
arrow 28, or reliance may be placed in the fact that buttons 20
should be above  trackball 18 during normal use.

      A system (not shown) into which card 10 may be plugged may
include slots for the insertion of such cards in various
orientations.  This feature may be used to advantage, so that a
right-handed user can operate the system with the card projecting
outward to the right, while a left-handed user operates the system
with the card projecting outward to the left.  Furthermore,
variations among systems may include such slots extending to the
front, or slots into which cards must be inserted in an inverted
orientation.

      For these reasons, pins 24 and sockets 26 are arranged so that
pointing device 16 can be plugged onto platform 22 in any of four
orientations at right angles to one another.  Because of the
possibility that a card may have to be installed within a slot in an
inverted position, a similar pattern of sockets may also be provided
on the surface of card 10 opposite to platform 22.

      The operation of pointing device 16 typically requires a ground
connection, a voltage connection, and a number of signal connections,
which transmit signals representing the closure of switch contacts by
the depression of buttons 20 and clock pulses generated by the motion
of trackball 18 in any direction.

      Card 10 provides a standard interface to the system through
contacts associated with socke...