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Special Mechanism for Handling O-0 and I-1-1 Confusions in Online Handwriting Recognition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106728D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chefalas, TE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Many online, handwriting recognition systems use elastic curve matching to match an unknown character against prototype (template) characters [1,2]. Such systems usually represent the ways of writing a character by a set of prototypes. A user prototype set is obtained by training on an individual user of the system. A general set of prototypes that covers the common ways of writing the characters, called a starter set, enables a new user to immediately use the recognition system. The walk-up recognition accuracy obtained by a new user of the system is a function of the coverage and quality (representativeness) of the starter set. The speed of recognition is inversely proportional to the size of the prototype set.

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Special Mechanism for Handling O-0 and I-1-1 Confusions in Online Handwriting Recognition

      Many online, handwriting recognition systems use elastic curve
matching to match an unknown character against prototype (template)
characters [1,2].  Such systems usually represent the ways of writing
a character by a set of prototypes.  A user prototype set is obtained
by training on an individual user of the system.  A general set of
prototypes that covers the common ways of writing the characters,
called a starter set, enables a new user to immediately use the
recognition system.  The walk-up recognition accuracy obtained by a
new user of the system is a function of the coverage and quality
(representativeness) of the starter set.  The speed of recognition is
inversely proportional to the size of the prototype set.

      In character recognition, O-0 and I-l-1 confusions are common.
Frequently, O and 0 are written identically with one circular stroke
(a stroke is the writing from a pen-down to a pen-up).  Similarly, I,
l, and 1 are often written identically with a single vertical stroke.
When written identically, these characters can not be discriminated
without using contextual information.

      In order to discriminate among O-0 and I-l-1, most systems
require the user to write the characters differently.  In our
prototype-based system, we also prefer that the user writes the
characters differently.  Using the standard convention, we create
prototypes as follows:  the letters O and o are made with a single
circular stroke, the lowercase l with a single vertical stroke, the
digit 0 is slashed with a second stroke, the uppercase I has top and
bottom bars, and the digit 1 has a bottom bar.  T...