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Browse Prior Art Database

Mechanism for Extending a Robot Stroke

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106734D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gorman, RE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a mechanism for lengthening the linear stroke provided by a robot. Motion produced using an air cylinder is added to the motion of the robot.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Mechanism for Extending a Robot Stroke

      Disclosed is a mechanism for lengthening the linear stroke
provided by a robot.  Motion produced using an air cylinder is added
to the motion of the robot.

      As shown in the Figure, a spline shaft 10 is mounted to slide,
without rotation, by means of anti-friction bearings 12 mounted in a
lower tube 14, which is in turn mounted with a press fit in a hollow
quill 16 of a robot.  A double-acting air cylinder 18 is mounted in
the upper end of quill 16.  Air cylinder 18 includes a shaft 20
attached to a piston 22, so that the introduction of air through
upper fitting 24 moves shaft 20 downward, while the introduction of
air through lower fitting 26 moves shaft 20 upward.  Spline shaft 10
is attached to air cylinder shaft 20 through a flexible coupling 28,
so that spline shaft 10 can be moved upward and downward through the
application of air through fittings 26 and 24.  A proximity sensor 30
senses an adjacent groove 32 in shaft 10 when shaft 10 is moved fully
upward, and a second proximity sensor 34 senses a groove 36 in shaft
10 when shaft 10 is moved fully downward.  Sensors 30 and 34 are
located on opposite sides of shaft 10.

      This mechanism may be used, for example, to extend the
effective vertical stroke of a robot, which moves quill 16 upward and
downward.  The lower end of shaft 10 may be fastened, for example, to
a gripper 38, used to pick up and hold a disk 40 or a cassette 42.