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Browse Prior Art Database

IBM OS/2 LAN Server 386 HPFS Boot Diskette with Administrator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106821D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Li, CM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This disclosure involves an invention in the IBM OS/2 LAN Server* 2.0 Advanced Server package. The Advanced Server includes a feature called Local Security. Local Security uses a "secure shell" program, in conjunction with the 386 HPFS file system, to provide an environment where file accesses by local programs are subjected to privilege and access checking, just as is done by the server for accesses by remote programs on client machines.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

IBM OS/2 LAN Server 386 HPFS Boot Diskette with Administrator

      This disclosure involves an invention in the IBM OS/2 LAN
Server* 2.0 Advanced Server package.  The Advanced Server includes a
feature called Local Security.  Local Security uses a "secure shell"
program, in conjunction with the 386 HPFS file system, to provide an
environment where file accesses by local programs are subjected to
privilege and access checking, just as is done by the server for
accesses by remote programs on client machines.

      An Access Control List (ACL) determines access privilege to a
file/subdirectory.  386 HPFS stores ACLs as part of the
file/subdirectory on disk.  Having 386 HPFS ACLs on the system's boot
disk is a requirement for Local Security to be effective.  Write
access to CONFIG.SYS by untrusted users must be prevented.  Device
drivers and processes started by CONFIG.SYS are privileged, because
they get loaded prior to the "PROTSHELL=<secure shell>" statement.
Also, the secure shell is started by CONFIG.SYS.

      OS/2's HPFS can not interpret ACLs, although it recognizes
their existence.  As a security measure, OS/2's HPFS does not allow
access to a file/subdirectory that has an ACL.

      Booting off diskette is frequently necessary to fix problems
with files on the hard disk.  If 386 HPFS ACLs are present on the
hard disk, users may not be able to get to the hard disk after
booting with an OS/2 HPFS boot diskette.  For this situation, a 386
HPFS boot diskette is needed.  Prior to this invention, a 386 HPFS
boot diskette was a security hole.  ACLs can not be placed on
diskette files, consequently the CONFIG.SYS file on diskette was
unprotected.

      A secure OS/2 386 HPFS boot diskette needed to be invented.
The secure boot diskette is needed to validate the user's authority
against the user account database on the locally secured hard disk.

The secure boot diskette had to do the validation with code that
could no...