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Browse Prior Art Database

Document Re-Insert Methodology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106863D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Freedman, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A Point-of-Sale printer that does not contain side insertion capability for the insertion of documents, has an apparent loss of function. A side insertion feature allows an operator to print new data at specific (or the next line) fields. This is required when updating documents such as layaway, charge, etc., type of documents.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Document Re-Insert Methodology

      A Point-of-Sale printer that does not contain side insertion
capability for the insertion of documents, has an apparent loss of
function.  A side insertion feature allows an operator to print new
data at specific (or the next line) fields.  This is required when
updating documents such as layaway, charge, etc., type of documents.

      A printer without a side insertion feature can simulate this
function through the use of a microcode algorithm.  An operator
inserts a document into the document stations, and feeds (via the
up/down paper feed buttons) to align the document to the desired
print position.  This will be several lines above the actual print
position.  At this point, the operator presses the "Document Ready"
key on the printer.  The microcode senses that both upper and lower
document sensors are made, and interprets the key depression as a
"Document Re-Insert" function as compared to a normal document
function.  As shown in the sole figure, the microcode then reverse
feeds the document back to a set number of steps, such that the next
line to be printed is at the proper location to be printed.  The
number of reverse line feeds for this operation is determined during
manufacturing setup and stored in non-volatile memory within the
microprocessor.  The result is that a new data entry is made after a
previously printed line, which emulates a side insert function.