Browse Prior Art Database

Electronic Payment System Architecture for Point Of Sale Application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106891D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Waters, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is an architecture interface in point-of-sale (POS) applications which allows separation of plastic card validation routines from the mainline program, simplifying and isolating it from changes in cards/services specifications. Merchants may accept alternative types of card payment without affecting POS software. Terms are defined at the end of this article.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Electronic Payment System Architecture for Point Of Sale Application

       Described  is an architecture interface in point-of-sale
(POS) applications which allows separation of plastic card validation
routines from the mainline program, simplifying and isolating it from
changes in cards/services specifications.  Merchants may accept
alternative types of card payment without affecting POS software.
Terms are defined at the end of this article.

      Existing techniques treat the process of validating plastic
within the sales application, with the result that sales applications
require modification to allow the merchant to accept alternative
types of plastic.  Also sales applications require modification to
cope with alternative international and local standards to electronic
credit and debit transactions.

      The disclosed architecture in POS applications separates the
sales process from the process of validating plastic, allowing the
POS application to treat cash and plastic tenders by the same
process.  By using a logic language to model the process of
validating plastic, new flexibility results to modify the validation
process. Changes that can be accommodated are as follows.

      Introduction of new types of plastic, differences in
international standards for electronic debit and credit transactions
and variations in policies of individual merchants for accepting
electronic payments.

      Plastic, unlike bank notes and coins, is not easily validated
by hand.  Even if genuine, the plastic itself is no indication that
the customer has the money to pay which is particularly important for
debit transactions.  Hence, there is a need for electronic checking
of the plastic using either a local database or a remote database
provided by an acquirer.  When paying with plastic the POS
application software must be able to regard plastic simply as an
alternative to a cash tender allowing the application to accept any
plastic.  In concept the information on plastic amounts to account
identification and status, but the detail of how individual plastic
is validated varies widely with card type and n...