Browse Prior Art Database

Table Driven User Paging

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106910D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Russell Jr, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

IBM applications provide customers with functionally rich solutions. Broad function can cause productivity problems for the end users: o Small companies purchase the entire solution but only want to use a subset of the function -- end users "wade" through information about functions they do not use. o Large companies use most of the functions but distribute the tasks among their end users -- end users "wade" through information related to another end user's job.

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Table Driven User Paging

       IBM applications provide customers with functionally rich
solutions.  Broad function can cause productivity problems for the
end users:
  o Small companies purchase the entire solution but only want to use
a subset of the function -- end users "wade" through information
about functions they do not use.
  o Large companies use most of the functions but distribute the
tasks among their end users -- end users "wade" through information
related to another end user's job.

      Letting the end users select the data they want to see and the
order in which they want to see it solves the problem.  By
categorizing the information by logical grouping, end users can
eliminate categories not wanted and rearrange the remaining
categories to suit the specific task.  This ability to eliminate and
rearrange categories within a task is called "user paging".

      For example, a manufacturing company keeps detailed information
about products in a data base.  The solution categorizes item
information in logical groupings:  general, inventory, engineering,
pricing, costing, planning, and purchasing information.

      A large company uses all the categories of information, but any
one user might only be interested in a few categories.  For example,
user paging lets the accountant eliminate unwanted groupings
(inventory, engineering, planning, purchasing information) and
rearrange the remaining groupings in the most useful order (pricing,
costing, general information).

      A small company not using the costing and purchasing categories
might have only one end user responsibl...