Browse Prior Art Database

Displaying Application Panes in a Minimized Icon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106926D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Li, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a design that outlines a strategy for presenting multiple panes in an application window when the window is minimized to a single icon.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Displaying Application Panes in a Minimized Icon

       Disclosed is a design that outlines a strategy for
presenting multiple panes in an application window when the window is
minimized to a single icon.

      One of the challenges for today's graphical applications lies
in their ability to present information to the user.  Every user's
ability to comprehend and absorb information differs and the
application must be able to impart detailed information to the user
through a variety of graphics, including the application's minimized
icon.

      This strategy assumes the application divides its information
into separate panes for display in its primary window.  For example,
a particular application design for presenting a database table
object has the potential for displaying three panes simultaneously:
a definition pane showing the attributes of the table, a data pane
displaying the data rows stored in the table, and an authorizations
pane providing the user with a list of the users with access to the
table.  Panes are a way for applications to separate and group like
information together.  Depending on the application, users may have
the ability to display one or all panes, as well as resize or
reposition panes based on their relative importance or the user's
preference. The vast majority of applications will use four panes or
less; the more panes, the more detail the user must keep track of.
Nevertheless, the following strategy addresses any number of panes in
an application.

      Instead of minimizing the application window to a single icon,
the application can extend the pane concept to provide the user with
more information about displayed and hidden panes.  For example,
depending on the resolution of the display, the minimized icon could
be divided into four mini-icons with each mini-icon representing a
pane.  Panes that were visible when the window was minimized would be
in reverse video, giving the user additional information about t...