Browse Prior Art Database

High Resolution Cropping

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106939D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Delp, HR: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method for cropping high-resolution images, including displaying on the monitor, in turns and in any order, the full image and each individual edge of the image is described. Each edge of the image is displayed by zooming the image in the direction perpendicular to the edge only by a factor large enough to see individual pixels. Pixels on either side of the cropping border are displayed. To enhance the ability to distinguish the parts of the image to be included vs. excluded, the cropping border can be alternately shown as a line superimposed on the image or as a masking border which replaces the excluded (cropped out) image with a solid color. This color of the masking border can be varied to enhance the ability to distinguish detail in the image.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 57% of the total text.

High Resolution Cropping

       A method for cropping high-resolution images, including
displaying on the monitor, in turns and in any order, the full image
and each individual edge of the image is described.  Each edge of the
image is displayed by zooming the image in the direction
perpendicular to the edge only by a factor large enough to see
individual pixels.  Pixels on either side of the cropping border are
displayed.  To enhance the ability to distinguish the parts of the
image to be included vs. excluded, the cropping border can be
alternately shown as a line superimposed on the image or as a masking
border which replaces the excluded (cropped out) image with a solid
color.  This color of the masking border can be varied to enhance the
ability to distinguish detail in the image.

      Normally, the operator first crops the image to a rough
approximation while viewing the full image on the monitor, as in Fig.
1. In this example, the operator is trying to crop out the frame of a
painting.

      Next, the operator concentrates on cropping one edge of the
image at a time.  The program zooms up on the selected edge in the
direction perpendicular to the edge only, so that, along the length
of the edge, the full image is shown, but in the direction
perpendicular to the edge, individual pixels on either side of the
cropping border can be seen, as in Fig. 2.  Curvature in edges in the
image that were presumed to be straight can be readily seen, as
exempli...