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Procedure for Detecting That an Outgoing Call From a Facsimile Service Has Been Forwarded by a Telephone Switch Back to Itself

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106952D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bhuta, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for providing facsimile (FAX) services to the public by means of computerized equipment to store-and forward FAX documents. One of the functions the equipment must perform is "Inbound Queuing." This function is used when someone calls the FAX machine of a subscriber while it is busy. Rather than present a busy signal to the caller, the telephone company's (TELCO's) switch will redirect the call to the computerized equipment where the FAX document will be received and temporarily stored. The equipment is then responsible for eventually (as soon as possible) delivering the document to the subscriber's FAX machine.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 57% of the total text.

Procedure for Detecting That an Outgoing Call From a Facsimile Service Has Been Forwarded by a Telephone Switch Back to Itself

       This article describes a technique for providing
facsimile (FAX) services to the public by means of computerized
equipment to store-and forward FAX documents.  One of the functions
the equipment must perform is "Inbound Queuing."  This function is
used when someone calls the FAX machine of a subscriber while it is
busy.  Rather than present a busy signal to the caller, the telephone
company's (TELCO's) switch will redirect the call to the computerized
equipment where the FAX document will be received and temporarily
stored.  The equipment is then responsible for eventually (as soon as
possible) delivering the document to the subscriber's FAX machine.

      Fig. 1 illustrates the case where a caller dials the number of
the subscriber's FAX machine and is connected by the TELCO's switch.
Fig. 2 illustrates the case where a second caller dials the number of
the subscriber's FAX machine.  Since the FAX machine is busy, the
switch redirects the call to the computerized equipment where the FAX
document is received and stored.

      The problem with such a solution is that, in order to deliver
the document, the computerized equipment will originate a call to the
subscriber's FAX machine.  If the machine is still busy, the TELCO's
switch will, again, redirect the call back to the computerized
equipment.  The computerized equipme...