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Non-destructive Method for Monitoring Thin Film Interdiffusion and a Thin Film Metallurgy for Packaging Application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106976D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cataldo, J: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Disclosed is a fast and non-destructive method for characterizing thin film metal to metal and metal to polyimide reactions. A thin film metallurgy containing a diffusion barrier is also described to prevent metal interdiffusion and reduce stress cracking. (Image Omitted)

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Non-destructive Method for Monitoring Thin Film Interdiffusion and a Thin Film Metallurgy for Packaging Application

       Disclosed is a fast and non-destructive method for
characterizing thin film metal to metal and metal to polyimide
reactions.  A thin film metallurgy containing a diffusion barrier is
also described to prevent metal interdiffusion and reduce stress
cracking.

                            (Image Omitted)

      In microelectronic packaging applications multilayer thin film
metallurgies are often used in order to meet the various
requirements, such as soldering or chip joining, pin brazing and wire
bonding, etc.  Metal interdiffusion often occurs during the substrate
fabrication processes and produced undesirable effects.  There are a
variety of sophisticated analytical techniques to measure
interdiffusion, such as Rutherford backscattering, cross-sectional
transmission electron microscopy, AES/ESCA surface and depth
profiling.  These techniques are destructive and require lengthy
analytical time and special techniques to interpret data.

      One simple and fast method is by measuring the resistivity
changes as a function of time and temperature. The increase of
resistivity after intermixing between adjacent film layers can be
interpreted with Matthiessen's rule.  The rule was formulated, as a
first approximation, that the measured resistivity is the sum of the
resistivities contributed by electron-phonon scattering,
electron-impurity scattering, and electron-defect scattering.
Therefore, when the discrete film layers are annealed in a
well-controlled non-oxidizing environment, and if alloying takes
place, it will...