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Chemical Filter for Magnetic Disk Data Storage Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107141D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 101K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beck, JL: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Most current magnetic storage devices use thin-film disks and read- write heads made of a ceramic material. Because the heads will experience sliding contact with the disks, good tribological performance is obtained by use of a molecular layer of lubricant. This film of lubricant is usually applied to the disks to reduce wear. But the performance of the lubricant can be adversely affected by the release of certain organic vapors that originate from components in the file by a phenomenon commonly referred to as outgassing. Such vapors can be detected as a molecular adsorbate on the critical surfaces of both heads and disks. In severe cases of outgassing, droplets of a distillate can be observed. In general, outgassing from adhesives can be most detrimental to good tribological performance.

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Chemical Filter for Magnetic Disk Data Storage Devices

       Most current magnetic storage devices use thin-film disks
and read- write heads made of a ceramic material.  Because the heads
will experience sliding contact with the disks, good tribological
performance is obtained by use of a molecular layer of lubricant.
This film of lubricant is usually applied to the disks to reduce
wear.  But the performance of the lubricant can be adversely affected
by the release of certain organic vapors that originate from
components in the file by a phenomenon commonly referred to as
outgassing.  Such vapors can be detected as a molecular adsorbate on
the critical surfaces of both heads and disks. In severe cases of
outgassing, droplets of a distillate can be observed.  In general,
outgassing from adhesives can be most detrimental to good
tribological performance.  Some thought is needed on this matter
since a wide assortment of adhesives are increasingly used in the
assembly of files today.  The chemical filter discussed here can
limit the effect of outgassing in a controlled way; it can also
reduce the level of common particulates and aerosols in the file
environment.

      The action of the spinning disk pack in a file will cause a
rapid mixing of air within the file environment. This airflow will
also aid in the transport of organic vapors emitted from plastic
components, adhesives, greases and organic residues present on any
internal surfaces. Through deliberate design, the rotating disk pack
can be made to produce a region of strong, laminar airflow that can
be directed through the chemical filter device.  This filter can
contain a variety of elements, of which some are capable of organic
adsorption for the purpose of removing outgassing.  Activated carbon
is an example of an absorbant material effective in the removal of
all organic vapors detrimental to file performance.  A particulate
filter is also needed to contain particles that may be shed from th...