Browse Prior Art Database

Policy Automation Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107157D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Leib, LD: AUTHOR

Abstract

The Policy Automation Tool (PAT) is a programming tool intended to support: 1) increased flexibility in application system to respond to new and changing business requirements; 2) easy translation of requirements into executable programs; 3) promote the sharing of common functions across business processes; and 4) increase the ease of, and reduce the cost of, program maintenance.

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Policy Automation Tool

       The Policy Automation Tool (PAT) is a programming tool
intended to support:
      1) increased flexibility in application system to respond to
new and changing business requirements;
      2) easy translation of requirements into executable programs;
      3) promote the sharing of common functions across business
processes; and
      4) increase the ease of, and reduce the cost of, program
maintenance.

      The objectives are achieved through the decomposition of
business processes into small functional units, the structured
specification of business rules, and the application of the tool
itself to generate executable programs from these elements.
Structured analysis and specification of business requirements is
required to define modular function, identify common functional
elements within the scope of business processes, and yield complete
and unambiguous statements of rules governing those processes. Once
complete in the appropriate form (policy language), these elements
serve as direct input to PAT for generation of executable programs.

      PAT generates executable programs by assembling several types
of components supplied by business requirements analysts and/or
application developers.  Essentially, these components are in the
form of:
      1) subroutines previously coded to perform specific operations
(functions, procedures);
      2) ordered lists of things to do elements which define a...