Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Time Bar with Editing Capabilities

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107168D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Martinez, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A Dynamic Time Bar and Editor Control is presented which meets the computer user's needs for a control that dynamically indicates the total length of an item. The control is also useful when editing sound through a graphical interface. The controls currently available for time elapsed indicators do not show total length dynamically, nor allow editing capabilities. This type of control is needed due to the technology explosion involving MultiMedia. This control is unique as it displays total possible elapsed time dynamically, and it provides sound editing capabilities. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Dynamic Time Bar with Editing Capabilities

       A Dynamic Time Bar and Editor Control is presented which
meets the computer user's needs for a control that dynamically
indicates the total length of an item.  The control is also useful
when editing sound through a graphical interface.  The controls
currently available for time elapsed indicators do not show total
length dynamically, nor allow editing capabilities.  This type of
control is needed due to the technology explosion involving
MultiMedia.  This control is unique as it displays total possible
elapsed time dynamically, and it provides sound editing capabilities.

                            (Image Omitted)

      This control is found in a graphical user interface. It
determines a total time parameter and then maps the time, from 0 to
the total time, in a graphical form.  As time elapses, during a play
back or a record, the graph fills accordingly.  In the example
depicted in the figures, the total time parameter is 6 minutes.  The
elapsed time is metered by the PC system clock and displayed to the
user interface.  The control first shows a one-minute interval as an
action progresses and then "flips" to  a display of the full
interval.  Usability tests showed that users are less confused when
they receive definite feed back.  The one-minute time bar fills up
much quicker, thus is more easily perceived by a user.

      The user can control sound by placing the mouse over the bar
graph and clicking the mouse button.  At this point, he can choose to
pla...