Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Icon Navigation to Nested Containers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107169D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

James, WS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A typical user interface in today's desktop environment may use containers to group like or dislike objects. The normal mode of operation to open a container is to double click on the icon. However, if the normal entry point to a container is a container which groups containers of other objects, the user must first double click on this container to open it, then double click on the container of like objects in order to open it. At this point they will finally be at the level where they wish to work on an object. This causes the user to take multiple actions to navigate to their target. This article suggests a solution to the problem that allows the user to navigate directly to a container based on a positionally sensitive icon action.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Dynamic Icon Navigation to Nested Containers

       A typical user interface in today's desktop environment
may use containers to group like or dislike objects.  The normal mode
of operation to open a container is to double click on the icon.
However, if the normal entry point to a container is a container
which groups containers of other objects, the user must first double
click on this container to open it, then double click on the
container of like objects in order to open it.  At this point they
will finally be at the level where they wish to work on an object.
This causes the user to take multiple actions to navigate to their
target.  This article suggests a solution to the problem that allows
the user to navigate directly to a container based on a positionally
sensitive icon action.

      Fig. 1 shows a screen that contains icons. Icon A is a
container that contains containers of other frequently used objects.
The typical navigation would be to double click on the icon (A) to
open the window (B), then to double click on an icon (C) to open the
container (D) which contains the object of interest (E).

      This article defines a method by which the icon (A) has
"target" areas that are sensitive to mouse double clicking. See Fig.
2 for more detail.  The user may position the cursor over the
"target" area of interest and double click to navigate directly to
the container of interest (D).  One "target" area is defined to open
the original container by...