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Ergonomic Pad for Workstation Graphic Tablet Puck (4-Button Cursor)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107191D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hanley, MF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an Erogonomic Pad for comfortable use of a Mouse or a Graphics Tablet Cursor or "Puck", which are commonly used with modern computers. This Pad provides comfortable use by allowing the user's hand to remain open and relaxed with the palm well supported by the soft foam padding.

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Ergonomic Pad for Workstation Graphic Tablet Puck (4-Button Cursor)

       Disclosed is an Erogonomic Pad for comfortable use of a
Mouse or a Graphics Tablet Cursor or "Puck", which are commonly used
with modern computers.  This Pad provides comfortable use by allowing
the user's hand to remain open and relaxed with the palm well
supported by the soft foam padding.

      The Ergonomic Pad does not require any modification to the Puck
or Mouse on which it is used.  Because the Puck or Mouse is held to
the Pad by friction, there is no need to permanently attach it.  This
feature enables the user to move the Pad from one workstation to
another.

      The Ergonomic Pad is constructed of a thin plastic sheet and
layers of foam sheeting (see Fig. 1).  The overall size and shape of
the Ergonomic Pad can be tailored to the user's requirements.
Thickness can be adjusted by changing the thickness and the number of
layers of foam sheet.

      Figs. 1, 2 and 3 illustrate one example of the Ergonomic Pad.
This example uses two foam sheets.  The thickness of the larger sheet
was chosen to match the thickness of the Graphics Tablet Cursor
"PUCK" as shown in Fig. 2.

      Fig. 2 demonstrates how the Ergonomic Pad is placed over the
puck itself.  The back end of the foam pad is pulled away from the
plastic sheet far enough to allow the puck to be passed through the
opening.

      Fig. 3 demonstrates how the puck is slid into the notch of the
Ergonomic Pad...