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Browse Prior Art Database

Graphical Passwords

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107201D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Najjar, LJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Computer users need to enter passwords to access an application or a restricted portion of an application. Most computer software applications use alphanumeric text for passwords. However, as user interfaces become more graphical, more object-oriented, and less textual, then computer users will increase their use of pointing devices. Pointing devices include mouse, touch, and pen. To support these pointing devices and to make user interfaces more appealing, applications should allow users to enter passwords using a graphical technique. Described here is a user interface design technique that allows software users to enter application passwords by selecting displayed objects sequentially. When users need to enter a password, the software application shows a set of predefined objects.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 78% of the total text.

Graphical Passwords

      Computer users need to enter passwords to access an application
or a restricted portion of an application.  Most computer software
applications use alphanumeric text for passwords.  However, as user
interfaces become more graphical, more object-oriented, and less
textual, then computer users will increase their use of pointing
devices. Pointing devices include mouse, touch, and pen.  To support
these pointing devices and to make user interfaces more appealing,
applications should allow users to enter passwords using a graphical
technique. Described here is a user interface design technique that
allows software users to enter application passwords by selecting
displayed objects sequentially.  When users need to enter a password,
the software application shows a set of predefined objects.  For
example, the objects could include a red cherry, yellow banana,
orange orange, and a green apple.  Users enter their unique passwords
by selecting the objects in an approved order.  If users are
operating a mouse pointing device, the users select each object by
positioning the mouse cursor onto each object and pressing the mouse
enter key.  A sample graphical password could be
apple-cherry-banana-banana. The application gives users feedback
about the number of objects selected by displaying a generic shape,
such as an asterisk, after users select each shape in the password.
The generic shapes reduce the likelihood that an observer will learn
the use...