Browse Prior Art Database

Corrosion Passivation Using Fluoropolymer Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107241D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brusic, V: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique for passivation of metal wiring on chips or computer packaging from corrosion and accelerated dissolution. Many metals when exposed to moisture are subject to corrosion. The dissolution rate will be enhanced in the presence of contamination or electrochemical driving forces, such as galvanic polarization and applied bias. Dissolution can be prevented by eliminating the contact of moisture with the surface of the metallic line. Furthermore, reducing the amount of moisture at the surface will reduce the rate of attack. This can be done in many ways, such as complicated packaging schemes or defect-free vacuum deposited barrier layers. In this disclosure a simple alternative is described.

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Corrosion Passivation Using Fluoropolymer Films

      Disclosed is a technique for passivation of metal wiring on
chips or computer packaging from corrosion and accelerated
dissolution.  Many metals when exposed to moisture are subject to
corrosion.  The dissolution rate will be enhanced in the presence of
contamination or electrochemical driving forces, such as galvanic
polarization and applied bias. Dissolution can be prevented by
eliminating the contact of moisture with the surface of the metallic
line. Furthermore, reducing the amount of moisture at the surface
will reduce the rate of attack.  This can be done in many ways, such
as complicated packaging schemes or defect-free vacuum deposited
barrier layers.  In this disclosure a simple alternative is
described.

      Metal surfaces are spray coated with a fluoropolymer coating
which is then allowed to dry.  This coating is unreactive to the
metal and provides a moisture barrier during testing and operation.
Cells coated in this way were shown to be stable and unreactive in
environments causing severe corrosion of uncoated wiring.

      Disclosed anonymously.