Browse Prior Art Database

Rapid Curing of Polyimides Using Inert, Vaporized Fluorocarbons

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107244D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Afzali-Ardakani, A: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Polyimides are used extensively in microelectronic industry because of their high temperature stability, good mechanical properties, low dielectric constant and resistance to common processing media. One drawback of polyimides is the long thermal process cycle (as much as 9 hours including heating and cool down) required to fully cure them in conventional ovens to achieve these properties. This leads to a significant increase in raw process time particularly if the structure fabricated involves several layers of coated and cured polyimides. Here, we describe an alternate method that allows rapid curing of polyimides.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 71% of the total text.

Rapid Curing of Polyimides Using Inert, Vaporized Fluorocarbons

      Polyimides are used extensively in microelectronic industry
because of their high temperature stability, good mechanical
properties, low dielectric constant and resistance to common
processing media. One drawback of polyimides is the long thermal
process cycle (as much as 9 hours including heating and cool down)
required to fully cure them in conventional ovens  to achieve these
properties. This leads to a significant increase in raw process time
particularly if the structure fabricated involves several layers of
coated and cured polyimides.  Here, we describe an alternate method
that allows rapid curing of polyimides.

      The method comprises the exposure of the spun and dried films
of the precursor material (e.g., polyamic acid or alkyl ester) to an
inert fluorocarbon vapor environment (Fluorinert FC-70, boiling point
215~C, for example). Vapors condense on the surface of the coating
and release the associated latent heat of condensation which provides
the temperature rise required for the curing process (e.g., polyimide
formation by conversion of the polyamic acid to a polyimide and/or
imide ring cyclization).  Further, the heat is delivered very
efficiently on to the precursor surface because of the excellent heat
transfer characteristics associated with the condensation process and
curing can be accomplished in as little as 10 minutes of exposure at
215~C to this medium. FTIR analysis o...