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Filtering Algorithm for Network Resource Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107291D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bam, ZT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for filtering dynamic network resource data using a linked list and global control flags. It also describes a conflict resolution method to be used between the filters using a set of rules implemented in this algorithm.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Filtering Algorithm for Network Resource Data

       This article describes a technique for filtering dynamic
network resource data using a linked list and global control flags.
It also describes a conflict resolution method to be used between the
filters using a set of rules implemented in this algorithm.

      When a filtering scheme has to be implemented in a software
product, there may be a need to filter data on the basis of different
characteristics associated with it.  In this technique, filters are
divided into two broad categories:
- global filters, and
- individual filters.

      The global filters are implemented using control flags and
individual filters are implemented using a linked list.

      When the same data needs to be filtered on the basis of
different characteristics associated with it, conflicts may arise
between filters; these conflicts will be resolved by a set of
predetermined rules.  These rules are used to govern the logic of
filtering the data.

      This implementation is illustrated here with an example of SNA
network resources.
Example:

      Filtering of SNA network resources is done on the basis of
resource name and/or resource type.  The status of SNA network
resources will either be forwarded or blocked depending on preset
filter entries.  Filters can be set by the user to do the following:
      1.   Forward status of all the resources (using wildcard
character *).
      2.   Block status of all the resources whose names start with R
(this is an example of wildcard character usage - R*. R* represents a
subset of all network resources).
      3.   Forward status of resource name RIPU (one element of R*
subset).
      4.   Block status of all the resources of the type LINE (this
may include resources whose names start with any alphabet including
R).

      Step 1:  First, categorize the above-mentioned four filters
into global filters and individual filters.  The rule of thumb is
when there is a term "all" or "all the resources of the type" in the
filter entry, the filtering logic is controlled by the global filters
and the filter entries with specific resource names (or partial
string tokens of resource names with wildcard characters associated
with them).  The filtering logic is controlled by the individual
filters.  In the above example, filter entries #331, #4 are
categorized as "global" filter entries and #2, #3 as "individual"
filter entries.

      Note:  This example uses #1, #4 as global filter entries, but
different applications implementing this algorithm can define more of
these global filter entries to suit their needs.
Data Structures and Initial Values

      Several pointers and global flags are used to implement this
technique; these are as follows:
      PTR_GF...