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Browse Prior Art Database

Universal Calendar Item Markers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107321D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kaufman, GS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Customers have stated that they wish to place items on their electronic calendars that can be of any duration: from one millisecond to days, weeks, months, or longer. Items stored in a computerized calendar are stored by their boundaries (when they start and end) only, and their duration is the calculated difference between these boundaries. To support the requirement for unlimited duration, it is necessary to interrogate all past and present "items" on a user's calendar to identify those "items" that belong to the range being searched. With most of the "items" on a user's calendar expected to be in the past, this method of searching is extremely inefficient and causes major performance problems. Figure 1 shows an example of this.

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Universal Calendar Item Markers

       Customers have stated that they wish to place items on
their electronic calendars that can be of any duration: from one
millisecond to days, weeks, months, or longer.  Items stored in a
computerized calendar are stored by their boundaries (when they start
and end) only, and their duration is the calculated difference
between these boundaries.  To support the requirement for unlimited
duration, it is necessary to interrogate all past and present "items"
on a user's calendar to identify those "items" that belong to the
range being searched.  With most of the "items" on a user's calendar
expected to be in the past, this method of searching is extremely
inefficient and causes major performance problems.  Figure 1 shows an
example of this. In Figure 1, of the twenty items on the calendar,
only five of the items (numbers 3, 14, 18, 19, and 20) actually fall
within the search "area".  However, all twenty items had to be
interrogated to make this determination.  As the number of items in
the data base increases, the performance of a search will degrade
rapidly since every item would have to be interrogated.

      Establish a system of "markers" to which calendar items can be
attached.  This attachment must be based on start time, end time and
duration of each item.  This system of "markers" must be universal,
and be unaffected by changes in time zone, or end user
"representational" calendar format (Gregorian, Julian, Islamic,
Japanese Era, etc., calendars).

      Times on calendar items are stored as the number of
milliseconds from 12:00 noon January 1, 4713 BC GMT.  All times are
converted to GMT before being stored, to support the various
"representational" systems for calendars, and to provide independence
from tim...