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Browse Prior Art Database

Application Modeling Process for Computer System Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107331D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 8 page(s) / 324K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lerom, SA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for application modeling which quantifies basic system compute requirements specifically enough and early enough to influence initial machine and software architecture and design. It creates the linkages necessary between leadership applications in market segments chosen to be served and the system design requirements that those applications generate. OBJECTIVES

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Application Modeling Process for Computer System Design

       Disclosed is a process for application modeling which
quantifies basic system compute requirements specifically enough and
early enough to influence initial machine and software architecture
and design.  It creates the linkages necessary between leadership
applications in market segments chosen to be served and the system
design requirements that those applications generate.
OBJECTIVES

      The primary objective of the application modeling process is to
ensure that the computing needs of the customers' applications are
translated early in the development cycle into technical requirements
that can be understood and used by system architects, engineers and
programmers to make product design decisions or trade-offs. Other key
objectives of the process are to: demonstrate a customer- or market-
driven approach, ensure that a valid business opportunity exists for
a proposed product, and demonstrate that the proposed product is a
"fit" for the opportunity.
DESCRIPTION

      The key differences with other requirements-gathering
processes, such as IBM's Quality Functional Deployment (QFD), are
that this process:  (1) is application oriented, (2) results in a
detailed technical quantification based on input from marketing
application experts and customers, (3) does not require a large
number of resources to implement, and (4) can be executed in a
relatively short period of time.

      The ten essential elements or steps of the process are
described.  Note that only application modeling steps #4 through #10
and the way that all of the elements are integrated and used are
actually what is new about this process.
STEP 1: Market Segmentation and Opportunity Analysis

      The market opportunity can be segmented many ways depending
upon market research data available and on current market trends and
issues. Segmentation can be made by system price range, by class of
computer system (e.g., supercomputer, mainframe, midrange,
workstation, personal computer, etc.), by class of user (e.g.,
technical professional, commercial, etc.), by operating system
environment (e.g., UNIX* or non-UNIX), by type of computing (e.g.,
numeric or non- numeric), by class of application (e.g., office,
chemistry, real-time, etc.), by type of application (e.g., database,
CAD/CAM, etc.), by system environment (e.g., standalone, host,
client, server, etc.), or by any combination of the above.

      For example, the worldwide opportunity can be divided into
technical professional and business or commercial users by various
price classes; and, for any given price class or range, the technical
- professional user opportunity, in turn, can be further segmented
according to the type of professional user as shown in Figure 1.
STEP 2: Market Segment and Leadership Application Selection

      The market segments chosen to be served are selected based on
their growth rates and business potent...