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Browse Prior Art Database

IBM Text Entry Visual

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107354D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Redpath, SD: AUTHOR

Abstract

The Text Entry visual designed for CUA* appears as a pale yellow solid box with a dark grey flushright label (see Fig. 1B). The pale yellow is just enough of a visual clue to separate it from the background, but allowing for the signal of the text it contains to be the stronger signal.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 90% of the total text.

IBM Text Entry Visual

       The Text Entry visual designed for CUA* appears as a pale
yellow solid box with a dark grey flushright label (see Fig. 1B).
The pale yellow is just enough of a visual clue to separate it from
the background, but allowing for the signal of the text it contains
to be the stronger signal.

      This text entry solution provides five types of entry fields
(see Fig. 2).  The five types are:  editable, scrollable, required,
error entry, and read-only.  An editable entry field is the pale
yellow box.  It softly appears and its edges are not harsh.

      Read-only information is fixed information that the user cannot
edit.  The entry field has a transparent background.

      When an entry field is required to be filled in, such as when
the information is needed to complete the task, a one-pel green line
will appear on the bottom edge of the entry field.

      When the user has made an incorrect entry, a one-pel red line
will appear around the left, bottom, and right edges of the field.
Enclosing the field in red lines gives a strong warning signal.
Differentiating it in shape from the required entry was necessary for
the color blind, and for monochrome displays.

      A scrollable entry field is used when all of the information
cannot be shown in the space available.  In this case, a dashed line
and an arrow would appear on the end(s) which has more information.

      The described interface is part of an effort...