Browse Prior Art Database

Thin Seeding for Repair and Circuitization of Boards and Modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107361D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chen, CJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

U.S. Patent 4,994,154 contains a claim referring to the use of thin or even discontinuous seeding for the repair of copper circuits in combination with high frequency current and plating solutions using a form of self-induced repair (*). The advantage of a thin or discontinuous seed is 1) cost saving in the seed material resulting from a minimum use of material, e.g., palladium acetate and 2) the ability to spin on material having a very low viscosity.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Thin Seeding for Repair and Circuitization of Boards and Modules

       U.S. Patent 4,994,154 contains a claim referring to the
use of thin or even discontinuous seeding for the repair of copper
circuits in combination with high frequency current and plating
solutions using a form of self-induced repair (*).  The advantage of
a thin or discontinuous seed is 1) cost saving in the seed material
resulting from a minimum use of material, e.g., palladium acetate and
2) the ability to spin on material having a very low viscosity.

      It is the purpose of this article to broaden and elaborate on
this concept to include the use of electrolytic or electroless
solutions after pyrolysis of the seed material.  In addition,
applications now are expanded to include 1) localized circuitization
of previously un- circuitized boards, modules or chips, 2)
circuitization of local opens on boards, modules or chips and
circuitization of local areas reserved for engineering changes.  In
general, the predetermined pattern to be circuitized is defined by a
computer program that drives a scanning laser, typically, the argon
ion laser, over a thin layer of Pd-acetate. Pyrolysis, leaving a thin
layer of Pd in the scanned region, is achieved using a focused
scanning laser directed onto the sprayed area to define a pattern
determined by a computer program.  After pyrolysis and removal of the
unpyrolyzed material, copper build- up of the very thin metal layer
is required.  This is accomp...