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Browse Prior Art Database

Attachment of TAB Devices Directly Using Molten Solder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107377D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nguyen, DQ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Attachment of Tape Automated Bonding (TAB) devices usually requires two major processing steps, namely, application of solder on the carrier and hot bar reflow that enables solder joints to be formed between TAB leads and pads. Proposed here is a method whereby the excised and formed TAB devices are registered on the footprint pads followed by application of molten solder in a continuous fashion directly over the outer leads, thus forming solder joints.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Attachment of TAB Devices Directly Using Molten Solder

       Attachment of Tape Automated Bonding (TAB) devices
usually requires two major processing steps, namely, application of
solder on the carrier and hot bar reflow that enables solder joints
to be formed between TAB leads and pads.  Proposed here is a method
whereby the excised and formed TAB devices are registered on the
footprint pads followed by application of molten solder in a
continuous fashion directly over the outer leads, thus forming solder
joints.

      Referring to the figure, a nozzle 'N' that supplies a molten
meniscus of solder can be used to accomplish the task via the
following steps:
      A.   The TAB device is excised, formed, inspected, picked and
placed onto the attachment site using conventional tooling.
      B.   A fixture 'F' holds the TAB in place just outside the toe
regions of the outer leads.  The fixture uses only low pressure since
intimate contact between leads and pads is not critical.
      C.   The nozzle carrying the molten solder ball travels across
the outer lead region in order to apply solder to the leads and pads.
Capillary action (i.e., surface tension) will cause the molten solder
to flow between the leads and pads to form solder joints.
      D.   A solder thief may be provided at the end of each row of
pads to minimize solder bridging of corner leads.