Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Gripping and Moving a Cassette Without a Gripper

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107426D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sendelweck, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a typical robotic device there is a gripper or clamping mechanism to grip the objects to be moved. This gripper is generally actuated by a motor, solenoid, or complex mechanism. In some storage devices, such as a cassette or optical disc library, the objects handled are standard. By putting features on the handled object and using the already necessary motions of the robot, the object can be moved without a gripping device. This saves cost and complexity.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Gripping and Moving a Cassette Without a Gripper

       In a typical robotic device there is a gripper or
clamping mechanism to grip the objects to be moved.  This gripper is
generally actuated by a motor, solenoid, or complex mechanism.  In
some storage devices, such as a cassette or optical disc library, the
objects handled are standard.  By putting features on the handled
object and using the already necessary motions of the robot, the
object can be moved without a gripping device.  This saves cost and
complexity.

      In Fig. 1 sleeve 2, motor 1, leadscrew 3, and nut 4 are parts
or an assembly on a robot.  To move object 5, nut 4 is driven under
object 5, which has a recess in the corner. Then the assembly of 1,
2, 3, and 4 is driven upward by the robot so that a stud on
nut 4 engages the recess in object 5.  Next, nut 4 is driven back
toward sleeve 2.  This draws the object into the sleeve.  When in the
sleeve the object is positively held and there is no possibility of
dropping or losing the object.  The robot can now move to its next
desired position for the object.  Arrows 6 show the motion sequence.
To place and unhook the object, the motion sequence is reversed.

      Fig. 2 shows the recess in the bottom of the object.