Browse Prior Art Database

Provide Interval Between Meetings on Electronic Calendars

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107466D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heggestad, SP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When meetings are scheduled on electronic calendars, they frequently end up scheduled "back to back". That is, a meeting will be scheduled from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., and the next meeting will be scheduled from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. This typically results in problems because meetings are rarely scheduled in the same room. Therefore, a person needs some amount of time to move between meetings. If the first meeting lasts to its end time, then the person will most likely be late for the next meeting.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 95% of the total text.

Provide Interval Between Meetings on Electronic Calendars

      When meetings are scheduled on electronic calendars, they
frequently end up scheduled "back to back".  That is, a meeting will
be scheduled from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., and the next meeting will be
scheduled from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.  This typically results in problems
because meetings are rarely scheduled in the same room. Therefore, a
person needs some amount of time to move between meetings.  If the
first meeting lasts to its end time, then the person will most likely
be late for the next meeting.

      Electronic calendars should provide the user with the ability
to specify a "separation interval" which would specify how much time
should be left between items already on the user's calendar and new
meetings which are added to the calendar.  The separation interval
would be invisibly "added" to the end time of each item already on
the user's calendar by the free time search function. For example,
suppose the user had set the separation interval to 10 minutes and
the meeting from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. was already on the calendar.  In
that case, a free time search of the user's calendar would show that
the calendar was busy from 10 minutes BEFORE 9 a.m., and to 10
minutes AFTER 10 a.m. (start time MINUS the specification interval to
end time PLUS the specification interval).  This would guarantee that
meetings could not be set "back to back" as long as the user
population made use of the free time search fu...