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Interactive Priority Change in Composite Calendar Graph

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107472D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baber, RL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The priority level of objects in a Tetris (colored block) graph are important properties that often influence what decisions the user may make as a result of viewing the graph. For example, 'Must have' priority objects (represented as colored blocks with white centers) are not likely candidates for deletion. At the other extreme, an object may be defined at a priority of 'FYI'. Such objects are not displayed since it is not important to the selection of free time. It would be advantageous to the user to be able to alter priorities interactively.

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Interactive Priority Change in Composite Calendar Graph

      The priority level of objects in a Tetris (colored block) graph
are important properties that often influence what decisions the user
may make as a result of viewing the graph.  For example, 'Must have'
priority objects (represented as colored blocks with white centers)
are not likely candidates for deletion.  At the other extreme, an
object may be defined at a priority of 'FYI'.  Such objects are not
displayed since it is not important to the selection of free time. It
would be advantageous to the user to be able to alter priorities
interactively.

      The solution is to provide a combo box with a list of the three
priority levels.  When a colored block is selected, its information
is displayed in the information area at the bottom of the pane.  The
combo box then allows the selection of any one of the three priority
levels for the object in the information area (in the example, the
object is a person named G. Smith). The three priority levels are 1)
must have, 2) nice to have, and 3) FYI.  A priority of 'must have'
causes the corresponding block(s) in the tetris graph to be redrawn
with white centers, the indication of that priority.  A priority of
'nice to have' yields the standard colored blocks (shown).  If a
priority of 'FYI' were to be chosen, all colored blocks representing
the object in the information area would be removed from the tetris
graph.  This removal is necessary because they...