Browse Prior Art Database

Fan Air Flow Dispersion Disk

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107484D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ing, PW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a thin circular disk attached on top of a fan (finger guard) that has a straight axial flow characteristics. The result is a more dispersed flow capable of cooling a much larger number of circuit cards with minimum loss of air flow delivery.

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Fan Air Flow Dispersion Disk

      Disclosed is a thin circular disk attached on top of a fan
(finger guard) that has a straight axial flow characteristics.  The
result is a more dispersed flow capable of cooling a much larger
number of circuit cards with minimum loss of air flow delivery.

      In an application which uses a standard 172 mm tubeaxial fan
for forced air cooling, it was found that hot spots (+25.9~C)
developed due to differences in the direction of the air flow from
fans similar in size and total air volume, but supplied by different
manufacturers. It is important to have more than one supplier of a
critical part, such as a cooling fan, so this performance difference
between fan vendors needed to be eliminated

      Without the flow distribution Disk/Finger Guard, the air flow
distribution was found to look like the sketch in Figure 1.

      With the dispersion unit in place (at the fan outlet (Fig.  2),
the air is more evenly distributed to the sides where it is needed
during concurrent maintenance (Fan Fail). (Figure 3).

      The Disk/Guard is similar to a standard fan finger guard, but
the more typical 73 mm center disk has been replaced with a 102 mm
Dispersion Unit.  This size disk was found to be an optimum for the
application shown.  The center disk can also be fabricated with a
raised edge to further enhance air dispersion.  (Figure 3).

      Disclosed anonymously.