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Selective Area Diamond Growth and Nucleation by Use of a Metal Catalyst

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107553D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fuentes, RI: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for growing crystalline diamond only in selected areas of a substrate. The selectivity is achieved by "activating" the areas on which growth is desired with a metal or its oxide. This acts to enhance the initial nucleation and growth rates, i.e., acts as a catalyst for diamond nucleation and its subsequent growth via a conventional PECVD method, without the prior application of diamond particles as in conventional seeding methods.

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Selective Area Diamond Growth and Nucleation by Use of a Metal Catalyst

       Disclosed is a method for growing crystalline diamond
only in selected areas of a substrate. The selectivity is achieved by
"activating" the areas on which growth is desired with a metal or its
oxide. This acts to enhance the initial nucleation and growth rates,
i.e., acts as a catalyst for diamond nucleation and its subsequent
growth via a conventional PECVD method, without the prior application
of diamond particles as in conventional seeding methods.

      Conventional methods for crystalline diamond deposition involve
some form of "seeding" step. Such a step typically consists of
scratching the surface to be deposited on with either diamond powder
or paste which, in turn, leaves behind surface defects, such as
scratches, in addition to microscopic diamond particles. Without
seeding, the diamond deposit usually consist of isolated clusters of
diamond and not a continuous film (1,2). To achieve selectivity,
additional lithographic steps are needed (3,4). The fact that the
surfaces have to be "scratched" or deliberately contaminated with
particulates greatly diminishes the compatibility of such techniques
with standard microfabrication processes.

      The disclosed process for enhanced and selective diamond
deposition makes use of a metal film deposited on a substrate,
typically silicon with a SiC buffer layer. It has the advantage of
not requiring surface preparation steps, other than those required
for the deposition of the catalytic thin metal film...