Browse Prior Art Database

Pivoting Z-Stage

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107645D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Byrnes, HP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Forthcoming test probes will demand wafer prober Z-stages which present wafers to the probe in a predictable and very parallel, controlled- force fashion. Prober Z-stages have historically incorporated some variety of bearing which, when loaded off-center by the forces of test probing, are subject to stiction and bending. Such conditions are exacerbated by increasingly large footprints and wafer sizes. It is also important to note that the forces of probing on all Z-states prior to the disclosed Z-stage are counterbalanced by force exerted on the probe mounting hardware via the wafer prober platen and various other machine members. Therefore, additional variations and unknowns exist with regard to maintaining parallelness under the high force of probing.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

Pivoting Z-Stage

       Forthcoming test probes will demand wafer prober Z-stages
which present wafers to the probe in a predictable and very parallel,
controlled- force fashion.  Prober Z-stages have historically
incorporated some variety of bearing which, when loaded off-center by
the forces of test probing, are subject to stiction and bending.
Such conditions are exacerbated by increasingly large footprints and
wafer sizes.  It is also important to note that the forces of probing
on all Z-states prior to the disclosed Z-stage are counterbalanced by
force exerted on the probe mounting hardware via the wafer prober
platen and various other machine members.  Therefore, additional
variations and unknowns exist with regard to maintaining parallelness
under the high force of probing.

      This invention relates to a variety of wafer prober Z-stage
which precludes the foregoing problems.  Here, the forces of probing
are always exerted axially between the probe and Z-stage, thereby
reflecting no probing forces to other machine members.  This is
accomplished by the pivoting arrangement illustrated in the figure on
the next page.  As shown, the thermal chuck is mounted on a
pancake-type Theta Platform which, in turn, is mounted near the
extremity of a Pivoting Arm.  This arm is pivoted on the vertical
portion of the Forcer Mounting Plate.  Also, as shown, a Guide Pin
attached to the Forcer Mounting Plate serves to prevent lateral
motion of the Pivoting Arm, moun...