Browse Prior Art Database

Method Registry and Pseudo Execution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107659D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Decker, SR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This disclosure describes a mechanism for simulating the execution of a "method." Such simulation, called pseudo execution or pseudo processing, is effected by means of the method wrapper of a process element.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method Registry and Pseudo Execution

       This disclosure describes a mechanism for simulating the
execution of a "method." Such simulation, called pseudo execution or
pseudo processing, is effected by means of the method wrapper of a
process element.

      In the definition stage of development, it is often desirable
to test the structure and logic of a business process without
affecting the production information that actual execution of
functional routines (methods) would generate.  Note: A method is a
program, procedure, or action performed on a data object.

      The same need arises when a specific method required in a
business process has not yet been developed. Pseudo execution allows
the definer to bypass missing methods and to continue defining the
process. This simulation permits easier management of alternatives in
the design of business processes. "What if" scenarios can be tested
with minimal effect on associated enterprise information and
processes.

      Pseudo execution also answers the need to determine the time-
dependent factors that might affect the completion of a business
process. The definer can better evaluate the logical structure of a
business process by using a "live model" of it.  The best points for
synchronizing parallel activities become clear when the logic
structure can be tested quickly and iteratively.

      Alternative results of method execution can also be tested
within the framework of a particular business process phase.  Managed
variations of alternative results can be accomplished quickly, not by
actually executing the method but by estimating the time the method
requires for its operation.  Maximum and minimum times for different
logical paths can be measured, as well as the effects of changes in
the design.

      Methods are described in a m...