Browse Prior Art Database

Stereo Video Capture System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107676D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 97K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Braudaway, GW: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

Disclosed is a system for capturing and recording stereo motion video. The system is constructed of standard, easily obtained video components.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Stereo Video Capture System

       Disclosed is a system for capturing and recording stereo
motion video.  The system is constructed of standard, easily obtained
video components.

      A stereo image pair consists of two images of a scene, each
taken from a slightly different position, in much the same manner as
a person views the world with two eyes. When each image of a stereo
pair is viewed by the proper eye, the relative horizontal
displacement of objects in the two images produces a sensation of
depth.  A stereo video sequence is simply a time-varying sequence of
stereo image pairs. The goal in this article is to configure standard
video equipment to capture and record a stereo video sequence.

      Most electronic video capture and recording equipment (cameras,
video tape recorders, etc.) fit the current NTSC television standard
of interlaced video.  In interlaced video each individual picture
(known as a "frame") in the video sequence is separated into two
fields of alternating video lines. The first field, for example, may
contain the even lines in the frame, and the second field the odd
lines. The NTSC standard frame sampling rate is 30Hz, with the field
rate twice the frame rate.  Such standard NTSC compatible video
equipment will be used in such a way that the information in the two
stereo channels is assigned to each of the fields, respectively. For
example, the sequence of images for the left eye may be captured into
the first field, and the right eye images into the second field, so
that each frame in the video sequence is composed of one stereo image
pair.
Capture Setup

      In order to capture stereo video into alternating fields as
described above, an optical system which mimics the configuration of
the eyes is needed.  One possible solution is to use two synchronized
video cameras and an analog multiplexer/switcher that combines the
first field of camera 1 with the second field of camera 2.  A better
alternative is to use a single video camera with an optical path
splitter and a pair of optical shutters synchronized with the...