Browse Prior Art Database

Mechanism to Allow Both Mirrors of Laser Bars to be Coated without Breaking Vacuum

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107712D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dietrich, HP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A sample holder for the vacuum deposition of thin films is described which during the deposition: 1. constantly moves the sample in a circle within the beam of material being deposited so as to improve uniformity, 2. maintains the sample with a fixed orientation relative to the deposition source, 3. flips the sample over to allow the other side to be coated while maintaining the same orientation of the substrate relative to the deposition source, and 4. uses only one rotary vacuum feedthrough to accomplish these motions.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 68% of the total text.

Mechanism to Allow Both Mirrors of Laser Bars to be Coated without Breaking Vacuum

       A sample holder for the vacuum deposition of thin films
is described which during the deposition:
1.   constantly moves the sample in a circle within the beam of
material being deposited so as to improve uniformity,
2.   maintains the sample with a fixed orientation relative to the
deposition source,
3.   flips the sample over to allow the other side to be coated while
maintaining the same orientation of the substrate relative to the
deposition source, and
4.   uses only one rotary vacuum feedthrough to accomplish these
motions.

      The diagram of the mechanism is shown in the figure. During
deposition, the axle 1 is driven continuously. The lower mechanism 2,
including axle 1, cam 3, rod 4, and gear-trains 5 and 6, causes the
shaft 7 to be carried around in a circle while at the same time it
rotates around its own axis with an equal but opposite angular speed.
The sample holder 8 is thus carried round in a circle but maintains
its orientation with respect to the deposition source (not shown).
The sample holder 8 is carried on a carrier 9 which can rotate by
means of a pinion wheel 10 , which meshes with grear teeth 11, and is
carried on shaft 12. During deposition, the friction from the shoe 16
causes the cup 13 to try to rotate. This rotates the pinion 10, in
turn, until the rod 14 hits a stop on carrier 13.   The sample holder
8 is then forced to lie in a horiz...