Browse Prior Art Database

Dielectric Isolation Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107726D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ma, WHL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a method of forming device isolation for semiconductor devices. The starting material is a clean silicon wafer. An oxide layer, such as thermal grown oxide or the like, is grown/deposited onto the wafer surface and followed by a photolithograph patterning (Fig. I). Fig. II shows the cross-section after directional RIE etch and resist strip. Figs. III and IV show cross-section after oxidation and blank RIE etch. The purpose of the oxidation is to grow/deposit dielectric material such as oxide onto the sidewall of the etched device well to form device isolation. The blank RIE etch is needed to expose the bottom of the well for seeding purpose for the subsequent EPI grow/deposition step (Fig. V). This EPI region will be used to fabricate active devices.

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Dielectric Isolation Process

       Described is a method of forming device isolation for
semiconductor devices.  The starting material is a clean silicon
wafer.  An oxide layer, such as thermal grown oxide or the like, is
grown/deposited onto the wafer surface and followed by a
photolithograph patterning (Fig. I).  Fig. II shows the cross-section
after directional RIE etch and resist strip.  Figs. III and IV show
cross-section after oxidation and blank RIE etch.  The purpose of the
oxidation is to grow/deposit dielectric material such as oxide onto
the sidewall of the etched device well to form device isolation.  The
blank RIE etch is needed to expose the bottom of the well for seeding
purpose for the subsequent EPI grow/deposition step (Fig. V).  This
EPI region will be used to fabricate active devices.  Upon completing
the EPI deposition, the surface is then planarized for additional
device processing (Fig. VI).