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Browse Prior Art Database

Modular Electronic Power Supply Load Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107750D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 9 page(s) / 325K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lindfors, EA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a modular electronic load system (ELS) which is designed for simulating loads for multiple output power supplies. The design provides a means whereby more than one ELS can be used to allow for higher current loads or an increase in the number of load banks (LBs).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 26% of the total text.

Modular Electronic Power Supply Load Device

       Described is a modular electronic load system (ELS) which
is designed for simulating loads for multiple output power supplies.
The design provides a means whereby more than one ELS can be used to
allow for higher current loads or an increase in the number of load
banks (LBs).

      The ELS is designed so that it can easily be reconfigured to
allow different power supply types to be tested.  If load
requirements change so that the present load modules are not
sufficient for a particular design, custom modules can be designed to
meet new requirements. Also, loading currents can easily be changed
or calibrated without having to physically modify the loads.

      The ELS base system is designed to dissipate approximately 500
watts with seven LBs.  Resistive or constant current loading can be
simulated.  For dynamic loading, an external oscillator is used.  The
device has the ability to provide overcurrent simulation and is
computer interfaceable/controllable for automated testing.  It is
easily calibrated and adjustable through the use of potentiometers.
Defec tive modules are easily unplugged and replaced.  It has low
load drift due to active circuitry.  It is compact and portable as
compared with general-purpose electronic loads. An adapter card
interfaces the ELS to a particular power supply.  The adapter card is
programmable to allow the same load to be used for different supplies
without modifying the load. It is customizeable in that unique load
modules can be used in the base system for special requirements.

      In prior art, resistive loads, using discrete power resistors,
were used to load the power supply.  As a result, each different
power supply required a different resistive load box.  When a power
supply became obsolete, the load box was generally discarded.  In
addition, resistive load boxes had a tendency to drift as the
resistors age.  Also, as loading requirements change, as happens
during development stages, load boxes required modifications.
Commercially available electronic loads are considered bulky and
require adjustment each time they were turned on and are not
considered to be portable.  The concept described herein improves on
the prior-art design by providing a re-usable, easily modified
portable load unit for use with various types of power supplies.

      The ELS is designed to power and cool individual load modules.
The load modules are small pluggable electronic load units.  Cooling
fans operate from a +16V input such that the base system requires +16
V at 0.6 Amp and -16V at 10 mAmp.  The base system generates +/- 12V
0.5 Amp output to power the modules.  The +12V powers the positive
voltage load modules, and the -12V powers the negative voltage load
modules.

      The base ELS unit, as shown in Fig. 1, consists of seven
separate LBs.  Each LB has provision to plug up to two load modules.
The power supply load contr...