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Through Hole to Circuitry Pattern Prealignment Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107795D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Darrow, RE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Via hole to exposed circuitry DIMSTAB compensation is achieved without compensating circuitry expose glass, thereby eliminating out-of-tolerance part problems at the end-of-line (EOL) roll processing.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 84% of the total text.

Through Hole to Circuitry Pattern Prealignment Method

       Via hole to exposed circuitry DIMSTAB compensation is
achieved without compensating circuitry expose glass, thereby
eliminating out-of-tolerance part problems at the end-of-line (EOL)
roll processing.

      DIMSTAB (dimensional stability) problems have historically been
a consistent source of error in thin film circuitry processing.  Any
TAB or FLEX on a polyimide or like dielectric changes during
processing due to chemical, thermal, and mechanical stresses imposed.
Via holes move during these stress-producing operations, especially
in a roll- to-roll processing environment where variable tensions are
used.

      DIMSTAB changes between the punch process and the expose
process have been a major yield detractor.

      Traditionally a parts-per-million (PPM) compensation factor for
the circuitry pattern was generated by tracking web measurements of
outboard holes punched in the web during processing.  Using the
change of these numbers from the nominals just prior to the circuitry
expose process, a glass compensation factor is generated via software
in an attempt to properly align the through-holes to circuitry.

      Described herein is a method which gives adequate glass
compensation while not affecting EOL tolerances.  Data collection
throughout roll product processing provides a feel for DIMSTAB
compensation at circuitry expose.  Instead of compensating at the
expose process, however,...