Browse Prior Art Database

PS/2 Mouse: Side Buttons for Direct Manipulation using Opposing Thumb

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107801D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, MD: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes an invention for the PS/2* mouse. The invention involves the addition of two buttons on the mouse designed to utilize a person's thumb. One button on each side of the mouse works for either left- or right-handed use.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 95% of the total text.

PS/2 Mouse: Side Buttons for Direct Manipulation using Opposing Thumb

       This article describes an invention for the PS/2* mouse.
The invention involves the addition of two buttons on the mouse
designed to utilize a person's thumb. One button on each side of the
mouse works for either left- or right-handed use.

      Currently, the PS/2 mouse does not use a person's natural
tendency to grab an object using the thumb.  The thumb is the
opposing appendage on the hand letting humans grasp objects.  It is a
more natural method of direct manipulation during a grab and drag of
an object within a graphical user interface (GUI) than any other.

      The buttons on either side of the mouse work together to
perform the same result. The result is the same when either one
button is depressed or both are simultaneously depressed. This means
that there is no ability for the software to poll for one button or
the other.  The hardware sees both buttons as if there were a single
button.

      A PS/2 mouse has two buttons which are both located on top of
the device. Each button serves various purposes depending on the
operating system and software applications running on the
workstation.

      Direct manipulation is the act whereby a user places the mouse
pointer over a movable object, presses and holds one or more of the
buttons down while moving the mouse to the desired location for the
object. During the move the object is displayed as being dragged.
Method...